Home Instead Senior Care ~ Avoiding Med Mismanagement

Prescription drugs are a scary business and sometimes, with the best will in the world, it’s easy for seniors and their loved ones to get a little mixed up on what they’re taking, when they should be taking it, where it’s stored, and what might cause a negative interaction.
In a survey, more than half of the seniors polled said they took at least five different prescription drugs regularly, and about 25 percent of the seniors took between 10 and 19 pills each day. So it’s really no surprise why they get confused!
Unfortunately, because many of these drugs are very strong, and medication regimens are often customized to a senior’s specific health condition and the other meds they are taking, there is precious little room for error.
Here are some ways you can help:
Make a List: This should include every prescription medicine your senior is taking, as well as anything over the counter such as a vitamin supplement, probiotic or low-dose aspirin. Other items to include:
  • Your senior’s name and date of birth
  • Each drug’s name
  • Dosage
  • Time/frequency taken
  • Whether food or liquid should be taken with it
  • Food or beverages to be avoided (i.e. leafy greens for blood thinners; alcohol)
  • Pharmacy and health care provider names, addresses and telephone numbers
  • Family emergency contact information
Keep a copy of the list prominently posted in your senior’s home and make sure one or two family members also have a copy. When filling prescriptions, bring it to the pharmacist for review.

One-stop shop for meds: Consolidating all prescriptions at one pharmacy is not only more convenient, it can help the pharmacist keep better track of any drugs your senior is taking and any possible interactions or side effects.

Mail-order?: If this is an option, it might help you take care of ordering your senior’s meds for them so they don’t run out. Just be sure to regularly consult a pharmacist in-person to red flag possible interactions or side effects.

Read and save the literature: We know, we know, it can seem like reams of paper come with every prescription, but it really is valuable information to prevent or alert you to new complications.

Get a med tray: They come in all shapes and sizes (consult your pharmacist for the one that suits your senior’s medicine regimen best). This will help both you and your senior keep track of what’s being taken.
For inquiring about medicine reminders or more information about caring for seniors, please contact us!

See more at: https://www.homeinstead.com/195/blog/avoiding-med-mismanagement#sthash.yWagohT2.dpuf

ADL Solutions ~ Bathing Solutions

Comfortable, Relaxing, Accessible Bathing is now Possible With the Best Bath ADL Spa in Scottsdale AZ

Who doesn’t love the luxury of siting in a nice, big, comfortable bath tub where you can sit back, relax, have some bubbles, and enjoy some peaceful time to yourself? It is a wonderful feeling and a great way to relax while also being able to bath. The hard part is that when someone acquires a disability, or has some very limited mobility, due to various reasons, they might not be able to enjoy that because they can’t access their current bath tub. It has become inaccessible. Luckily Best Bath has come up with the ADL Spa bath tub that is accessible for anyone of any age. So let’s take a look at the features and benefits of this amazing spa bath tub.
ADL Spa
  • The tubs’ pressure-sealed door slides open, allowing users to transition into the tub directly from a wheelchair or walker, or for assisted entry via a lift.
  • The optional jetted system, which includes an Ozone3 Sanitation System, combines a seven-jet hydro massage and a 15-jet air massage.
  • The hydrotherapy system relieves stiff muscles and joints, features rotational jets for additional relief to the feet and lower back, and uses the Syllent water pump, the quietest on the market.
  • The tubs are available with a right-hand or left-hand opening, and come standard in white with a white cabinet base; biscuit, bone, linen, and almond tub colors are available as upgrades.
  • A range of special-order colors and a selection of 12 wood-grain cabinet faces can be specified for a custom look to match any décor. Additional options include a two- or three-wall surround, grab bars for the wall surround, and a harness and seat strap system.
With the improved access provided by the bathtub, individuals of all abilities may be able to remain in their homes longer. And it also has the benefit for parents as well. They would no longer have to strain their backs bending over a bathtub to bath their children.

Ability Center ~ Which Wheelchair Van is Right for You?

Which Wheelchair Van is Right For You – Side Entry or Rear Entry?

At Ability Center, we specialize in helping our valued customers find the right accessible van for their needs, budget and lifestyle. Many times families are curious as to what type of wheelchair van is best; a side-entry handicap vanrear entry handicap van or a van with a ramp that comes out the rear of the vehicle.
When thinking of these two options, we have four things we will discuss to help you make the best decision; Parking, Position of the wheelchair, Passengers and Price(4 P’s).
Parking

One consideration when thinking about what type of wheelchair accessible van to purchase is parking. Rear entry vehicles have an easier time in crowded parking spots because the entry and exit of the wheelchair passenger can take place in any parking spot; it doesn’t necessarily have to be a large handicap parking spot. However, keep in mind that you will be loading and unloading the wheelchair passenger into the flow of traffic. In areas of the country where much of the parking is done curbside/parallel, a rear entry van may not be the best option because you’ll need significant room behind the vehicle to load the wheelchair. Side entry vans have the opposite benefits; it’s easier for parallel parking because the ramp can be deployed on curbs. However, parking lot parking can be difficult at times with so many limited large handicap parking spaces that allow 8′ for the ramp to deploy.

side entry wheelchair van
Position of the wheelchair

Ask yourself this question, where would I like the wheelchair to be positioned and where is the person using the wheelchair going to sit. Some people with disabilities have the ability to transfer out of their wheelchair onto the front driver or passenger position. If this is the case, a side-entry van is best suited for you since the whole floor of the vehicle is cut out making for an easy transfer. Some people like to remain in their wheelchair and sit in their chairs in the front driver or passenger position after removing the front seat of the van. If this is the case, a side-entry is best suited for you as the seats are on bases that are removable. Rear entry vans have a portion of their floor lowered which makes for a neaBraun Chrysler Wheelchair Vanrly impossible option for the wheelchair passenger to sit in the front two seats. If the person in the wheelchair has a caregiver and will not drive or sit in the front passenger position, a rear entry van is a great option. Some rear entry vans have jump seats so the person in the wheelchair can be positioned in the middle of the van with brothers, sisters, grandchildren, etc. sitting next to them.

Passengers

The third thing to consider is how many passengers will be transported with the wheelchair van? Rear entry vans can accommodate more people because many have fold down seat options in the middle. However, there are some side-entry vans that have jump seats in the middle as well. This question goes hand in hand with the position of the wheelchair; look at the family as a whole and how you will be using your van.

Price

Lastly let’s talk money. In many cases rear entry vans are less expensive because they are geared towards caregivers so many of the conversion features are manual. However, in the last couple of years there have been some reasonably priced side entry manual wheelchair conversions that are a great option as well. toyota braun wheelchair van

One more thing to think about is to try before you buy. At Ability Center, we offer wheelchair vans for rent. Try a side-entry one weekend and a rear-entry the next weekend. Many times, we will put the cost of the rental towards the van you purchase from us. Our goal is to make sure you have the right van for your family.
Call us at 866-405-6806 or email info@abilitycenter.com or visit us online @

Recreation Services at Haven Senior Horizons of Phoenix

Patients and FamiliesPatients at Haven Senior Horizons of Phoenix have access to a variety of Therapeutic Recreation services. Our staff of Activity Therapists, Social Worker and Behavioral Health Technicians work to meet the individual needs of our patients through a variety of methods.
Within Activity Therapy Groups, patients can enjoy Music Therapy, Hand/Eye Coordination skills, pet therapy or basic life skills. Other activities assist with motor skills or focus on stimulation of senses with the use of essential oils and other mediums. Reminiscence groups are an important part of therapy and focus on memories and sharing.
Social Services Groups provide opportunities for patients to work on processing skills, coping skills and emotional regulation skills to aid in stress management and build self esteem.
In conjunction with Therapeutic Group Activities and Social Services Groups, Haven Senior Horizons also offers Family Support Groups to help families as they experience challenges while caring for their loved one.
Behavioral Health Technicians facilitate several groups each day to meet each individual’s specific needs at varying levels of cognitive ability. These groups offer fun, interactive recreations including karaoke, bingo, current events, trivia and cards.
Haven Senior Horizons is here to serve your family and meet your needs. Please contact us at 623-236-2000 for more information.

MD 24 House Call ~ Signs & Symptoms of Diabetes

Diabetes Mellitus is the name given to a group of conditions that occurs when the level of glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood becomes higher than normal. Insulin is a hormone that moves glucose from your blood-stream, into the cells of your body where it is used for energy. Diabetics cannot make enough insulin or the insulin that is being made does not work properly. This causes blood glucose levels to become too high while impacting your short and long term health.

Diabetes-Mellitus-1.jpg
In type 1 diabetes, your immune system destroys cells in your pancreas that make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is not under attack. It usually makes enough insulin. But your body does not use it well. The symptoms of the two forms are similar, but usually come on more quickly in people with type 1.

Individuals can experience different signs and symptoms of diabetes, and sometimes there may be no signs. Some of the signs commonly experienced include:
  • More thirsty than usual
  • passing more urine
  • feeling tired and lethargic
  • slow-healing wounds
  • itching and skin infections, particularly around the genitals
  • blurred vision
  • nausea and vomiting
  • weight loss
  • mood swings.

Often in type 2 diabetes signs and symptoms may not be present.

Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow sugar (glucose) to enter cells to produce energy. The far more common type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin or does not make enough insulin.

Various factors may contribute to type 1 diabetes, including genetics and exposure to certain viruses. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it also can begin in adults.

Despite active research, type 1 diabetes can be managed but has no cure. With proper treatment offered today, those infected can expect to live longer, healthier lives than those of the past. Type 1 diabetes can happen at any point in life. But it is mostly diagnosed before the age of 19.

Having high blood sugar for a long time can damage many of your body’s systems. Type 1 diabetes can make you more likely to have:
  • Heart disease and stroke
  • Kidney failure
  • Blindness or other problems seeing
  • Gum disease and tooth loss
  • Nerve damage in the hands, feet, and organs

Type 1 diabetes signs and symptoms can surface rapidly and may include:

  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Bedwetting in children who previously did not wet the bed during the night
  • Extreme hunger
  • Unintended weight loss
  • Irritability and other mood changes
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Blurred vision
  • In females, a vaginal yeast infection

Type 2 diabetes, once known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes, is a chronic condition that affects the way your body metabolizes sugar (glucose). Your body either resists the effects of insulin — a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells — or does not produce enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level.

More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity continues to grow. There is yet to be a cure, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise are not enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetic medications or insulin therapy.

Type 2 diabetes is sometimes described as a ‘lifestyle disease’ because it is more common in those struggling with obesity while ignoring physical activity. Also known as non-insulin dependent diabetes or mature onset diabetes, It’s strongly associated with high blood pressure, abnormal cholesterol levels, or the ‘apple’ body shape. (excess weight around the waist.) While most diabetics are mature adults (over 40), younger people are also now being diagnosed in greater numbers as rates of obesity increase.

Type 2 diabetes symptoms often develop slowly. In fact, you can have type 2 diabetes for years and not know it. Look for:
  • Increased thirst and frequent urination. Excess sugar building up in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from the tissues. This may leave you thirsty.
  • Increased hunger. Without enough insulin to move sugar into your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This triggers intense hunger.
  • Weight loss. Despite eating more than usual to relieve hunger, you may lose weight. Without the ability to metabolize glucose, the body uses alternative fuels stored in muscle and fat.
  • Fatigue. If your cells are deprived of sugar, you may become tired and irritable.
  • Blurred vision. If your blood sugar is too high, fluid may be pulled from the lenses of your eyes. This may affect your ability to focus.
  • Slow-healing sores or frequent infections. Type 2 diabetes affects your ability to heal and resist infections.
  • Areas of darkened skin. Some diabetics have patches of dark, velvety skin in the folds and creases of their bodies — usually in the armpits and neck. This condition, called acanthosis nigricans, may be a sign of insulin resistance.

Pre-diabetes is a risk factor leading to the development of type 2 diabetes. It’s a condition in which blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but still not diabetic. There are no defined symptoms, but risk factors include obesity, smoking, heart disease, polycystic ovary syndrome and high blood pressure. Without treatment, 33% of pre-diabetics will develop type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

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There are two types of pre-diabetes: Impaired Glucose Tolerance and Impaired Fasting Glucose.
Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than non-diabetic ranges post-meals. IGT typically occurs in overweight and physically inactive people – and a greater risk in those with heavy midsections.
There are often no symptoms associated with IGT and we recommend an immediate assessment if you notice one or more associated risk factors. An oral glucose tolerance test is required to help your doctor determine if you have IGTY. All you need to do is submit a sample of your blood the a lab for your physician to examine.
Impaired Glucose Fasting (IGF) occurs less frequently than IGT and incorporates fasting blood glucose levels that are higher than non diabetic ranges, but not classified as diabetic.
Pre-diabetes is diagnosed by a blood test that checks your blood glucose level. Any blood glucose test that shows higher than normal blood sugar levels needs to be examined and diagnosed. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may be required and it’s results will show whether your blood sugar levels are normal.
Women, especially those expecting, should be aware of the symptoms of gestational diabetes. The complications of diabetic women are difficult to pinpoint and women can experience the following symptoms:
  • Thrush and yeast infections
  • Itchiness around the vagina
  • Female sexual dysfunction
diabetes-3.jpg
Vulvovaginal Candidiasis, or vaginal thrush, can be a symptom of diabetes as high blood sugar levels can cause glucose to be excreted through urine. Glucose in urine can create yeast infections. Here are some symptoms to consider:
  • Soreness and itching around the vagina
  • Reddening of the skin
  • A white curd like appearance on the skin
  • White vaginal discharge
  • Pain during intercourse
Oral yeast infections can also occur as a symptom of diabetes. High blood sugar can also lead to a lack of natural vaginal lubrication which makes sex difficult or painful.
The symptoms of diabetes in men and women are similar but some are more noticable in men. Specific male diabetic symptoms may include:
  • Reduced strength from loss of muscle mass
  • Recurrent episodes of thrush around the genitals
  • Itching of or around the penis
  • Erectile dysfunction

diabetes-1-2.jpg

Reduced strength and loss of muscle mass, unexplained loss of muscle mass may be a sign of high sugar levels in men. If blood sugar levels remain high for a long time, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. The resulting weight loss is usually most noticeable in people with type 1 diabetes, but can affect those with long-term undetected type 2.
More than 33% of diabetic cases occur in seniors over the age of 65. At the same time, almost 210,000 U.S. children and adolescents are said to be diabetic – and counting. It’s important to catch children’s diabetic symptoms quickly. Here’s what you should look for:
Early symptoms:
  • feeling tired or weak
  • Mother comforting daughter in bed
  • frequent peeing (urination) in large amounts (polyuria)
  • increase in thirst (polydipsia)
  • weight loss
  • increase in appetite (polyphagia)
  • dry mouth or throat

More serious symptoms:

  • These symptoms appear if the diabetes is not treated, or in some cases when it is undiagnosed.
  • drowsiness
  • weight loss
  • nausea and vomiting
  • heavy, rapid breathing (Kussmaul breathing)
  • stomach aches

Excessive thirst and urination are typically the first indications of high blood glucose levels in kids. While younger children may begin enuresis (wetting the bed), some get up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom (nocturia).​. The loss of sugar in the urine, together with dehydration, and lack of blood sugar is a bad combination. This can lead to weight loss despite an increase in appetite (polyphagia). As the symptoms develop and worsen, a child can become tired, drowsy, and weak.

children.jpgDiabetic signs and symptoms may not be as clear in newborns and toddlers as a language barrier, regular growth spurts, and changes in appetite throw off the analysis. In these cases, your child can develop serious symptoms before diabetes is even recognized. Fungal or yeast diaper rash that doesn’t improve with the use of medicated cream should also be considered as a sign – even though common.
Diabetes is a complex condition, which can affect the entire body. Understanding this disease is truly important even if you don’t have it. In your lifetime, you’ll most likely know a diabetic.
MD24 House Call is one of the leading institutions for Arizona diabetes care. MD24‘s specialists work closely with diabetic educators, dieticians, and podiatrists to help patients to develop insight into their condition, manage symptoms, and relate more positively to others. The first step in seeking help is to visit MD24 House Call and arrange a health assessment. Call (888) 632-4758 for registration inquiries or visit our website www.md24housecall.com and “Request a Visit.”


MD24 House Call is proud to be able to assist the patients we already serve and look forward to serving the healthcare needs of new residents who register with us.
Visit us online @ www.MD24HouseCall.com

Caring Senior Service ~ The 5 Main Do’s & Don’t to Planning Retirement

The 5 Main Do’s & Don’t To Planning Retirement

Retirement planning can be overwhelming, but getting it right can make a huge difference in your future. These are a few things that you should remember when working on your retirement planning, no matter what your age is.

1. Don’t Wait Too Long
It can be easy to put off retirement planning until the last minute, especially if funds are tight. However, the sooner that you can get started, the better. It’s never too late to start planning, but it’s never too early, either. No matter how old or young you are, now is the time to start taking steps to save money, invest and otherwise plan for the future.
2. Do Work With a Financial Adviser
Many people attempt to do their own retirement planning, but there are a lot of tax breaks, types of accounts, investment opportunities and more that you probably don’t know about. If you sit down with a financial adviser, you can get pro advice to help you make the most of your money and your future.
3. Don’t Take Out Your Social Security Early
Many people take out their social security early so that they have the money as soon as possible. This can cause your payments to be dramatically reduced for the rest of your life, so you should look for other options so that you can withdraw later.
4. Do Make Arrangements for Living Changes Early
If you are thinking about refinancing your home so that you can enjoy lower payments during retirement, you should do so before you retire. Otherwise, you could have a tough time getting approved for a loan if you don’t have a job. If you are planning on moving into a retirement community or other setting, you should also start planning for these things while you are still working.
5. Do Create a Budget
You might not work with a strict budget now, but you are going to need one in retirement. Start keeping track of how much you spend on things like food, medication, clothing, gas and more now. Then, you will have accurate numbers to work with when writing up this budget.
Now is the time to start thinking about your future, so remember these do’s and don’t’s to planning retirement while you are making important decisions. For more assistance for seniors, you can also contact us at Caring Senior Service http://phoenix.caringseniorservice.com/

IN THE SPOTLIGHT ADL Solutions Inc.

We are pleased to announce our newest advertiser in the
Welcome ADL Solutions, Inc.!

ADL Solutions is a total solution company. We offer evaluations and assessments in the facility and home setting to provide a variety of options and recommendations to modify the environment to meet the needs of the individuals served.

ADL has a team of professionals that understand the world of accessibility. We are committed to keeping up with the latest innovations and products in the industry to bring state-of-the-art equipment and concepts that can improve the quality of life for the individuals served.

We are Certified Environmental Access Consultants (CEAC), Certified Aging in Place Specialists (CAPS), and Executive Certificate in Home Modification (ECHM), to help determine the most effective way to assist facilities & individuals with their needs.
We provide the complete installation of equipment and all the construction work necessary to modify the facility or home setting.

Our exceptional team of commercial and residential contractors are fully licensed and bonded. We also sell all the innovative and state-of-the-art adaptive equipment needed for the modification. Providing a variety of solutions and resources to help improve the quality of life for those in our community is at the very heart of what we do.

Visit us online @ www.adl-solutions.com

IN THE SPOTLIGHT Elmcroft Senior Living

We are pleased to announce our newest advertiser in the
Welcome Elmcroft of Tempe!

About Us

Based in Louisville Kentucky, Elmcroft takes great pride in offering much needed services for seniors across the United States. Elmcroft has 102 senior care communities, including 79 assisted living communities, 4 multilevel retirement communities and 19 health and rehabilitation centers serving over 6,000 residents in 19 states.
At Elmcroft, we are dedicated to providing compassion and kindness to our residents and fellow employees. Our mission is to enrich the lives of those who live and work with us by responding to their unique needs and universal desire for dignity and respect.
We are mindful that each resident comes to us with an individual set of needs. For some, those needs are as simple as companionship, a church service or a few kind words throughout the day. For others, it’s assistance with the basics of daily living such as housekeeping, laundry and more. Still others require more specialized care including therapy services, skilled nursing and rehabilitation services.
Our trained and tenured staff are here to serve the many differing needs of our residents, promoting creative thinking and learning, with patience, kindness and, above all, compassion.
The later years of life can bring many joys and many challenges. At Elmcroft, we are committed to making these precious years fulfilling and enjoyable. And we will do this through our passionate pursuit of excellent care and service.

Resources

At Elmcroft we understand the decision to place yourself or your loved one in another’s care is a complex one; there are many factors to consider. We would like to be a resource to help you make the decision that is best for you and your family based on your specific needs and wants. We have assembled some resources below to help, but we encourage you to reach out to one of our communities for assistance as well.

WHEN IT’S TIME

What are the signs that a move to a senior living community might be a good option?
  • Mobility issues – difficulty with daily activities or frequent falls and other safety concerns
  • Memory loss – misplacing items or wandering away from home
  • Medication concerns – forgetting to take medications as prescribed
  • Lack of socialization – not interacting as usual; untidy surroundings and poor personal hygiene
  • Fear and depression – unwilling to seek medical help or assistance; withdrawal from others
  • Lack of appetite – not receiving proper nutrition throughout the day
If you or your family member are experiencing any of these signs the move to a senior living community may in fact be a very good option. Whether a long-term or short-term stay, seniors often improve through socialization, regular diet and medication management, as well as relieving the burden they often feel they have placed on their family. You are free to resume your relationship and enjoy the company of your loved one without the worry of providing for their needs.

CHOOSING THE RIGHT COMMUNITY

You should take the time to visit the senior living communities you are interested in to see which will be the best fit for you. Each visit is an opportunity to get to know the community and staff better.
The Assisted Living Federation of America has developed an evaluation tool to help you get all the answers you are looking for before you choose the community that’s right for you.

FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

How will you cover the cost of a senior living community? This is a concern for many families. Follow the link below to view the financial options available to seniors and their families

MAKING A SUCCESSFUL TRANSITION

We understand that you, just like your loved one, are going through a life-changing transition. Our goal is to make that process as comfortable as possible – for both of you.
You will have more quality time with your loved one because our caregivers are doing their day-to-day physical care. And you will have peace of mind knowing that your loved one is getting 24-hour care and you can focus on your own health needs.
  • It will take you and your loved one time to adjust, but remember why you chose to make the move to a senior living community.
  • Give your relationship time to adjust. You are still an important part of your loved one’s life.
  • Take care of yourself. Allow time for physical exercise, rest and play. Nurture yourself.
  • Reconnect with friends; surround yourself with supportive people.
Making the decision to surround your loved one with trained professionals who can meet their needs is a selfless act. It is important that you understand you will still be involved in medication and level of care concerns and that no one lights up your loved one’s life like you, so visit often and cherish those moments.

Here's to life.

IN THE SPOTLIGHT Caring Senior Service

We are pleased to announce our newest advertiser in the
Welcome Caring Senior Service!

Long Term Care Options

At the Caring Senior Service of Phoenix, we understand that deciding on long term care
for yourself or an aging loved one is not an easy decision. Making the right

choice requires some research into the different options available to you.

To help we have provided a brief description of the most common options available

as well as a few facts about home care.

Nursing Home

Nursing homes offer skilled nursing care given by a registered nurse and include

medical monitoring and treatments. Skilled care also includes services provided by

specially trained professionals, such as physical, occupational, and respiratory therapists.

A nursing home facility may be a good choice for people who require 24-hour

medical care and supervision.

Assisted Living

Assisted living facilities offer housing alternative for older adults who may need help

with dressing, bathing, eating, and toileting, but do not require the intensive medical

and nursing care provided in nursing homes.


Independent Living

The operative word at any independent living community is “independent.” For the

most part, residents are active seniors who are ambulatory and are able to complete

all of the activities of daily living without assistance.

Non-medical Home Care

Non-medical home care focuses on helping seniors with the daily activities they need

to engage in to remain safe, healthy, and at home. In addition to assisting with daily

activities non medical homecare offers one on one companionship. A well

placed caregiver can help a senior continue participating in their favorite activities

such as gardening, baking or woodworking.

Homecare Facts

  • According to an AARP survey almost 90% of people over 50 want to stay in their

    homes as long as possible.

  • More than 80% of individuals who need long-term care receive it in their home.
  • Caring Senior Service believes every senior should be able to remain healthy, happy,

    and at home

  • No home can be 100% risk free but you can make yourself aware of many common

    hazards by downloading our free 43 Point Home Safety Assessment.

For a more detailed look at your long-term care options download this free eBook,

The Complete Road Map to Long-Term Care. The eBook will walk you through how to

approach the process of finding long-term care, will give you a better understanding

of your care options, and will help you learn how to receive the care that you need.

BrightStar Care ~ I Have Alzheimer’s, Now What?

I HAVE ALZHEIMER’S, NOW WHAT?

If you been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, don’t worry, you are not alone. There are people who understand what you are going through, and help is available. There is much you can do in the early stage to cope with the changes ahead. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, it’s normal to experience a range of emotions upon receiving a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s.
Emotions you may have
You may be grieving over the present losses you are experiencing, or the expectation of future changes as the disease progresses. It can be helpful to identify and understand some of the emotions you may experience after receiving your diagnosis.
  • Anger: Your life is taking a different course than the one you and your family had planned. You cannot control the course of the disease.
  • Relief: The changes you were experiencing were cause for concern. A diagnosis validated these concerns by assigning a name to your symptoms.
  • Denial: The diagnosis seems impossible to believe. You may feel overwhelmed by how your life will change as a result of Alzheimer’s.
  • Depression: You may feel sad or hopeless about the way your life is changing.
  • Resentment: You may be asking yourself what you did to deserve your diagnosis or why this is happening to you and not someone else.
  • Fear: You may be fearful of the future and how your family will be affected.
  • Isolation: You may feel as if no one understands what you’re going through or lose interest in maintaining relationships with others.
  • Sense of loss: It may be difficult to accept changes in your abilities.
Taking care of your emotional needs
Coming to terms with your diagnosis and the emotions you are feeling will help you accept your diagnosis, move forward and discover new ways to live a positive and fulfilling life. When working through your feelings, try a combination of approaches. Try the following tips:
  1. Write down your thoughts and feelings about your diagnosis in a journal.
  2. You may find your friends and family struggling with your diagnosis and their feelings. Learn more about how you can help family and friends.
  3. Share your feelings with close family and friends. Speak open and honestly about your feelings.
  4. Surround yourself with a good support system that includes individuals who are also living in the early stage of the disease and understand what you’re going through.
  5. Join an early-stage support group. It can provide you with a safe and supportive environment of peers. To find a support group in your area, check with your local Alzheimer’s Association chapter.
  6. Talk to your doctor if you or others are concerned about your emotional well-being. Your doctor can determine the most appropriate treatment plan to address your concerns.
  7. Seek help from a counselor or clergy member. He or she can help you to see things in a new way and help you understand more fully what you are feeling.
  8. If you are feeling misunderstood or stereotyped because of your diagnosis, learn what you can do to overcome stigma.
  9. Stay engaged. Continue to do the activities you enjoy for as long as you are able.
  10. Take the time your need to feel sad, mourn and grieve.
If you have any questions about getting support for Alzheimer’s at home or need additional resources, contact our local office. We are here for you.
Visit us online @ www.BrightStarCare.com

BrightStar Care ~ The Many Faces of Dementia

THE MANY FACES OF DEMENTIA

In honor of National Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month, let’s take a look at another debilitating cognitve affliction – dementia. Here’s a breakdown of the dangerous neurocognitive disorder, according to alz.org:
Physicians often refer to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) to guide them in determining if an individual has dementia and, if so, the condition causing dementia. The latest edition of the manual, DSM-5, classifies dementia as a neurocognitive disorder.
Dementia may be either a major or a mild neurocognitive disorder. An individual must have evidence of significant cognitive decline, and the decline must interfere with independence in everyday activities (for example, assistance may be needed with complex activities such as paying bills or managing medications).
Furthermore, an individual must have evidence of modest cognitive decline, but the decline does not interfere with everyday activities (individuals can still perform complex activities such as paying bills or managing medications, but the activities require greater mental effort). When an individual has these or other symptoms of dementia, a physician must conduct tests to identify the cause.

Different causes of dementia are associated with distinct symptom patterns and brain abnormalities.

Increasing evidence from long-term observational and autopsy studies indicates that many people with dementia, especially those in the older age groups, have brain abnormalities associated with more than one cause of dementia, otherwise known as mixed dementia.
In some cases, individuals do not have dementia, but instead have a condition whose symptoms mimic those of dementia. Common causes of dementia-like symptoms are depression, delirium, side effects from medications, thyroid problems, certain vitamin deficiencies and excessive use of alcohol.
Unlike dementia, these conditions often may be reversed with treatment. One meta-analysis, a method of analysis in which results of multiple studies are examined, reported that 9 percent of people with dementia-like symptoms did not in fact have dementia, but had other conditions that were potentially reversible.

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN WOMEN AND MEN IN THE PREVALENCE OF ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE AND OTHER DEMENTIAS

More women than men have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. Almost two-thirds of Americans with Alzheimer’s are women. Of the 5.1 million people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s in the United States, 3.2 million are women and 1.9 million are men.
There are a number of potential reasons why more women than men have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. The prevailing view has been that this discrepancy is due to the fact that women live longer than men on average, and older age is the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer’s.
Many studies of incidence (which indicates risk of developing disease) of have found no significant difference between men and women in the proportion who develop Alzheimer’s or other dementias at any given age.
However, limited new research suggests that risk could be higher for women, potentially due to biological or genetic variations or even different life experiences. Data from the Framingham Study suggests that because men have a higher rate of death from cardiovascular disease than women in middle age, men who survive beyond age 65 may have a healthier cardiovascular risk profile and thus a lower risk for dementia than women of the same age, though more research is needed to support this finding.

RACIAL AND ETHNIC DIFFERENCES

Although there are more non-Hispanic whites living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias than people of any other racial or ethnic group in the United States, older African-Americans and Hispanics are more likely than older whites to have Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.
A review of many studies by an expert panel concluded that older African-Americans are about twice as likely to have Alzheimer’s and other dementias as older whites, and Hispanics are about one and one-half times as likely to have Alzheimer’s and other dementias as older whites.
Variations in health, lifestyle and socioeconomic risk factors across racial groups likely account for most of the differences in risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias by race. Despite some evidence that the influence of genetic risk factors on Alzheimer’s and other dementias may differ by race, genetic factors do not appear to account for the large prevalence differences among racial groups.
Instead, health conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes, which increase risk for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, are believed to account for these differences as they are more prevalent in African-American and Hispanic people.
Lower levels of education and other socioeconomic characteristics in these communities may also increase risk. Based on data for Medicare beneficiaries age 65 and older, Alzheimer’s disease or another dementia had been diagnosed in 8 percent of white older adults, 11 percent of African-Americans and 12 percent of Hispanics.
For more of our Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month coverage, click here. Or, contact our local team to get any questions you have answered or request dementia care and support.
Visit us online @ www.BrightStarcare.com

Home Instead ~ Avoiding Med Mismanagement

Avoiding Med Mismanagement

Prescription drugs are a scary business and sometimes, with the best will in the world, it’s easy for seniors and their loved ones to get a little mixed up on what they’re taking, when they should be taking it, where it’s stored, and what might cause a negative interaction.
In a survey, more than half of the seniors polled said they took at least five different prescription drugs regularly, and about 25 percent of the seniors took between 10 and 19 pills each day. So it’s really no surprise why they get confused!
Unfortunately, because many of these drugs are very strong, and medication regimens are often customized to a senior’s specific health condition and the other meds they are taking, there is precious little room for error.
Here are some ways you can help:
Make a List: This should include every prescription medicine your senior is taking, as well as anything over the counter such as a vitamin supplement, probiotic or low-dose aspirin. Other items to include:
  • Your senior’s name and date of birth
  • Each drug’s name
  • Dosage
  • Time/frequency taken
  • Whether food or liquid should be taken with it
  • Food or beverages to be avoided (i.e. leafy greens for blood thinners; alcohol)
  • Pharmacy and health care provider names, addresses and telephone numbers
  • Family emergency contact information
Keep a copy of the list prominently posted in your senior’s home and make sure one or two family members also have a copy. When filling prescriptions, bring it to the pharmacist for review.
One-stop shop for meds: Consolidating all prescriptions at one pharmacy is not only more convenient, it can help the pharmacist keep better track of any drugs your senior is taking and any possible interactions or side effects.
Mail-order?: If this is an option, it might help you take care of ordering your senior’s meds for them so they don’t run out. Just be sure to regularly consult a pharmacist in-person to red flag possible interactions or side effects.
Read and save the literature: We know, we know, it can seem like reams of paper come with every prescription, but it really is valuable information to prevent or alert you to new complications.
Get a med tray: They come in all shapes and sizes (consult your pharmacist for the one that suits your senior’s medicine regimen best). This will help both you and your senior keep track of what’s being taken.
For inquiring about medicine reminders or more information about caring for seniors, please contact us!

– See more at: https://www.homeinstead.com/195/blog/avoiding-med-mismanagement#sthash.YZVREt8Q.dpuf

Jackson White Law ~ Staying In-Network for Long-Term Care

Staying In-network for Long-term Care

Richard A. White JacksonWhite Law, Mesa Arizona
Question: I filed an Arizona Long Term Care System application for my wife nearly a year ago, and I have had a horrible time trying to manage and understand the process on my own. After many months of working on this process, I am now being told that my wife has to move to a different facility in order to qualify for the benefit. Can ALTCS really tell me where my wife has to live?
Answer: ALTCS will never decide where your wife will live — this is your decision to make. Before ALTCS will approve your wife’s case, however, she must reside in an approved setting.
To clarify, ALTCS is just like any other insurance provider insofar as it will only provide coverage to its members who seek care from an in-network provider. Just like with any other insurer, ALTCS has a network of providers with which it is contracted to provide care.
As long as the setting in which you place your wife has an ALTCS contract, she will be eligible for coverage if she is otherwise eligible for the benefit.
It is worth mentioning that ALTCS contracts with care providers all along the healthcare continuum. There are approved in-home care providers, group homes, day care centers, assisted living facilities and skilled nursing facilities. Further, it is not as if there is a clear demarcation between ALTCS and non-ALTCS facilities — all ALTCS facilities also have non-ALTCS residents; and ALTCS members are given the same level of treatment and care as others.
If the only thing preventing your wife from qualifying for ALTCS is this setting requirement, it would certainly be worth considering moving to an approved setting to help facilitate eligibility. You have many good options available to you, and this benefit is too valuable to forgo.
Richard White is an elder law attorney at JacksonWhite Attorneys at Law. For more information on Elder Law at JacksonWhite, please visit www.ArizonaSeniorLaw.com.